about Yachtsnet online yacht brokerage
yachts for sale on brokerage
classified adverts for boats and yachts
Yachtsnet's archive of boat data and photographs
Charter a Sun Odyssey 35 from Falmouth
How to contact Yachtsnet by phone, fax or e-mail
Useful links to marine and sailing related websites
Frequently asked questions about Yachtsnet and our services
© Yachtsnet Ltd. 2000/2017

 

 
Yachtsnet's archive of boat details and pictures
 

The following information and photographs are displayed as a service to anyone researching yacht types. HOWEVER THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD. Details and photographs are normally based on one specific yacht, but could be a compilation. No reliance should be placed on other yachts of the same class being identical.  Where common variations exist, we have endeavoured to indicate this in these archive details.

Trapper 300

Brief details

Builder

Trapper Yachts, Poole

The Trapper 300 is a 1970s-era cruiser-racer that offers good performance, with the potential for club racing as well as fast cruising.

LOA

26' 3"

Sail area

360 sq ft

LWL

20' 6"

Rig

Sloop

Beam

9' 6"

Cabins

Saloon & forecabin/heads

Draught

4' 10"

Berths

5

Displacement

4,410 lbs

Engine

usually Yanmar diesel

Ballast

2,028 lbs

BHP

8

Keel type

Fin keel and spade rudder

Trapper 300

The Trapper 300 was designed for Trapper Yachts in 1976 by Bruce Kirby, designer of the Laser dinghy. The prototype was a quarter-ton racer, but the Trapper 300s were all built as dual-purpose cruiser-racers. In total about 180 were built, with two different interior layouts. The Mk I, of which the boat illustrated is an example, had a more racing-derived fitout, whilst the later Mk II boats were more aimed at cruising, with simpler deck gear.

In common with most other quarter-tonners of the period, the Trapper has wide beam and very flared topsides, giving a lot of power to windward if you put crew weight outboard on the rail. Nevertheless, she has enough ballast to be sailed efficiently without racing-style crew placement. At least one has been sailed transatlantic with a crew including three children.

The design is fast to windward, and not slow offwind. In May 2009 "Practical Boat Owner" reviewed the class, and reported that the boats were ".... light on the helm and delightfully responsive; one of the few boats that you want to sail for the pure fun of sailing."

Trapper 300

Below: In the Mk I Trapper 300s, the backrests to the saloon seats hinge up to extend the cushioned shelves above into two pilot berths, with trotter boxes at the forward (foot) end. The saloon seats themselves are too short for most adults to sleep on. There is also the vee-double in the forecabin, and a deep quarter berth aft.

Trapper 300

Yachts seen here are no longer for sale - the data is online as a free information service for buyers researching boat types. THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD.

Go to our brokerage section for boats currently for sale

Trapper 300

The heads compartment is between saloon and forecabin, but is really "in" the forecabin. There is a hinged door separating the saloon from the heads, but nothing between the heads and the forecabin berths.

The saloon interior has a internal GRP headlining, hence no drooping vinyl as in many other boats of this age.

Yachts seen here are no longer for sale - the data is online as a free information service for buyers researching boat types. THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD.

Go to our brokerage section for boats currently for sale

Trapper 300

Most Trapper 300s had Yanmar YSE-8 inboards, although some boats will by now have been re-engined, possibly with a more powerful engine. A few boats were outboard-powered.

The deck layout is clean and uncluttered, with lines led back to winches and clutches on the coachroof. There is as small anchor well in the foredeck. The race-inspired origins of the boat are obvious in details such as the recessed mooring cleat intended not to catch lines or the spninaker.

Most keels were cast iron, and many boats have had a small lead bulb added to the bottom of the keel as a modification to increase righting moment, as seen in the photo below. A lead-antimony keel was an extra-cost option when the boat was new, but not many seem to have been sold with this racing option.

Trapper 300

about us

brokerage

classified

archives

charter

web links

contact us