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Yachtsnet's archive of boat details and pictures
 

The following information and photographs are displayed as a service to anyone researching yacht types. HOWEVER THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD. Details and photographs are normally based on one specific yacht, but could be a compilation. No reliance should be placed on other yachts of the same class being identical.  Where common variations exist, we have endeavoured to indicate this in these archive details.

Virgo Voyager

Brief Notes

Builder

Newbridge Boats, and N.B. Yachts Ltd., Somerset

The Virgo Voyager has remarkably spacious accommodation for her size, with 6 foot headroom in the saloon. Despite the high-volume hull, they sail well, with a high 50% ballast ratio. Most have inboard engines, Volvo Penta and Buhk diesels and Vire petrol engines were fitted, plus a few were supplied with outboard power via a transom bracket

Length OA

23' 0"

Sail Area

333 sq ft main and genoa

Length WL

19' 10"

Rig

Sloop

Beam

8' 4"

Cabins

2

Draught

2' 9" bilge keel, 4' 0" fin keel or 2' 0" to 5' 0" centreboard version (rare)

Berths

4/5

Displacement

4,400 lbs

Engine type

inboard or outboard

Ballast

2,200 lbs

Engine bhp

7 - 12

Keel type

Choice of twin bilge keels, longish fin keel, or centreboard in stub fin keel, all with rudder on half skeg

Designed by Roy Lunney in 1972 for Newbridge Boats, the Virgo Voyager is a strongly constructed small cruiser, with good accommodation for its size, providing up to five berths if required, with six foot headroom in the saloon. The high freeboard and cabin top needed to achieve this is disguised considerably by the styling, with wide contrast stripes along the boot-top, under the gunwales, and around the coachroof, where the painted stripe continues the line of the tinted windows.

The first boats built were fin-keeled, but later lift keel and bilge-keelers were also built. About 300 boats in total were built, the design continuing in production from 1973 to 1990.

The bilge-keeled boats retain part of the stub keel of the fin keel version: on early bilge-keelers this still has the flat base onto which the fin would have been bolted, but later the moulds were altered to make the central vestigial keel more rounded.

Yachts seen here are no longer for sale - the data is online as a free information service for buyers researching boat types. THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD.

Go to our brokerage section for boats currently for sale

In a yacht of this size a movable or removable table is by far the most practical, and in the Voyager the table slides up the central post to stow against the deckhead, giving a remarkably spacious area. The table can also lower to form a base to make the settee into a double berth if required, whilst the forecabin also converts to a double. The separate heads compartment can either have a marine WC or chemical toilet, with good hanging locker space opposite. Aft of the galley on the starboard side is a good quarterberth (below centre)

The forward part of the cockpit sole has a large removable waterproof hatch allowing complete access to engine and sterngear when required. There is also a small access hatch under the companionway in the saloon

Right and above: brochure photos

Yachts seen here are no longer for sale - the data is online as a free information service for buyers researching boat types. THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COVERED BY COPYRIGHT, AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF YACHTSNET LTD.

Go to our brokerage section for boats currently for sale

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